Broad-leaved Paperbark

paperbark gum nuts which will open to reveal seeds

Melaleuca quinquenervia Family: Myrtaceae Origin: Australia, New Caledonia and Papua New Guinea Broad-leaved paperbark, or niaouli, is a medium-sized, fast-growing tree native to Papua New Guinea, New Caledonia and the eastern coast of Australia–from Botany Bay to Queensland and the Northern Territory. Paperbarks have also spread to the Everglades of Florida, where it is … [Read more...]

Lillypilly

Lillypliiy's attractive, small flowers

Syzyigium australe Family: Myrtaceae Origin: Eastern Australia A very popular and native Australian tree, this wonderful (usually) tree is grown in lots of ways. It has been bred into many cultivars suitable for many uses in the garden. Lillypilly can have a lot of names and has been misnamed many times because of the range of cultivars it comes in. Names like Brush Cherry, … [Read more...]

Ivory Curl

Ivory Curl, Buckinghamia celsissima

Buckinghamia Celsissima Family: Proteaceae     Origin: Rain forests from Mt Spec to Cooktown The Ivory Curl is a beautiful feature tree often seen in the backyards and found in undisturbed bushland in its native area. According to the Australian Native Plants Society, the tree is named after Richard Greenville, the Duke of Buckingham. As the tree is common enough in the … [Read more...]

Tulipwood

A tulipwood in Archerfiels

Harpullia pendula Family: Sapinsaceae       Origin: Tropical and sub-tropical eastern Australia A popular garden and urban tree, Tulipwood is a beautiful, native, hardy, and well-behaved small tree that suits landscapes well. It’s commonly used along urban coastal roads, as its toughness helps it to thrive in salty areas along ocean shores and in the less than ideal air and … [Read more...]

Foxtail Palm

foxtail palm in algester, brisbane

Wodyetia bifurcata Family: Arecaceae        Origin: Endemic to Cape Melville, Northern Queensland Foxtail palms are now prolific not just in Brisbane but all over the world in tropical and sub-tropical climates. That's quite remarkable, considering they were unknown to the world just over thirty years ago. They were brought to botanists attention in 1978, growing in Cape … [Read more...]